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#141 – War for the Planet of the Apes and Modern Biblical Narratives

On this episode of the Reel World Theology Podcast:

The new Planet of the Apes trilogy has been one of the more surprisingly satisfying set of films over the past decade. What could have been yet another stale or bland attempt to cash in on intellectual properties of the past turned out to be an incredibly reflective and compelling look at humanity through the eyes of non-humans. War for the Planet of the Apes caps the trilogy with some heavy narrative borrowing from history. What can we learn from stories that have already been told?

Download Episode 141 Here:

Reel World Theology #141 – War for the Planet of the Apes and Modern Biblical Narratives
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This episode’s panel included Laura Fissel and Ben Avery:

Laura Fissel (@laura_fissel)
www.laurafissel.com
Family Restoried
Who-ology

Ben Avery (@whisperingloon)
BenAvery.com
Strangers and Aliens Podcast
Welcome to Level Seven Podcast

Podcast Notes and Links:
Reel World Theology Discussion Group
War for the Planet of the Apes at IMDB
War for the Planet of the Apes at Rotten Tomatoes
War for the Planet of the Apes Review at Cinemayward
War for the Planet of the Apes Review at Reel Spirituality
War for the Planet of the Apes Review at National Catholic Register
War for the Planet of the Apes Review at Slash Film
War for the Planet of the Apes is the Summer’s Most Essential Blockbuster at Vox

Written by Mikey Fissel

Mikey Fissel (@fizzification) is the Creator/Producer/Managing Editor of Reel World Theology. He lives in Greensboro, NC with his wife, Laura, and their son, Jon Luke. He finds much joy from recounting his catch-phrase, "Story is Powerful and Entertainment is Not Mindless..."

  • I’m one of those people who didn’t like it. And not because it was “too good”. It was a pale imitation of Apocalypse Now, and did itself no favors by inviting comparisons to that much better film. I share all your gripes with the film, but wasn’t in the tank enough to ignore them, in part because I didn’t think Dawn was an improvement over Rise (though it was at least better than War).